All The Best Game Music Is On SoundCloud

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You know this probably sounds like a self explanatory title, but if you haven’t ever heard of SoundCloud it is a streaming music site that is used by a lot of unsigned bands and DJ’s/Composers to showcase their talents. Those can be original songs, remixes, podcasts and anything in between.

But it’s also home to a lot of excellent and beautiful music from our beloved video games. Many developers have released songs to stream on the site and Playstation also have a great load of game music on their page as well. In fact, you can find a lot of publishers, developers and composers who have released their game music on SoundCloud. No longer are iTunes or Spotify the only places you can find these gems of video game composition. So just to be a bit of debate starter I’m going to list some of the favourites that I’ve found, my personal highlights if you will, and if you have anymore then please link them and share.

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Everybody’s Gone To The Rapture promised many things and it has delivered on them so far. One of these things was a beautiful soundtrack. Composed by Jessica Curry and James Morgan, Dust and Shadow is just one of the haunting choral and orchestral melodies that you will here in the game.

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Max Payne’s dark, disturbing and melancholic theme is one thing that has stuck throughout the series. There is a great communication in the soundtrack to a game sometimes that perfectly portrays the world and character. This version of the cello theme from Max Payne 3’s composers HEALTH is one of the most haunting versions.

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Ok so this is a bit of a cop out but it is on there and I challenge you to find a better game that so brilliantly uses the leitmotif in this theme and throughout game. Gustavo Santaolalla is a magnificent composer and, like all good entertainment, his score is one vital part of a great big experience.

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I’ve put this here because it is a wonderful score in general. The darkness of Mordor and the lore that precedes the green prettiness of JRR Tolkein’s Hobbit and Lord of the Rings is here in abundance. It is also is co-composed by Nathan Grigg and Garry Schyman, the latter name you might know from the Bioshock series.

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Long live Tangerine Dream. Edgar Froese’s music is one of the great things that glues Grand Theft Auto together. His electronic progressive rock that mixed with experimental soundscapes gave us an excellent connection between three otherwise distant and different characters. Whilst the music featured on Grand Theft Auto is some of the best popular music in recent years, the music OF Grand Theft Auto is also some of the best composed music.

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Here we go on a bit of a love letter to Devolver Digital, but we said in our review of Titan Souls that one of the things that really binds the feeling of loneliness in the game is the music, expertly composed by David Fenn. The inspirations behind this are easily recalled which is a testament to how well the music has captured the genre and respected those that came before it.

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Are you kidding me? Of course we’re going to have some Hotline Miami on here. In fact the entire soundtrack to the first game is available on Devolver’s page and is perfect for a Friday afternoon countdown to the weekend.

There are some great selections from Hotline Miami 2 as well. These two are my personal favourites but you should definitely look them up yourself.

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Here’s a more fantasy based game with The Witcher 3. Polish composer Marcin Przybylowicz’s soundtrack (featuring Percival) is a brilliant achievement and as many of the games journalists on the internet will testify to, a great part of an even greater game. You’ll also find some select cuts from The Witcher 2’s soundtrack on his page as well.

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I make no bones about the fact that the Halo soundtracks are some of my favourites. I’ve waxed lyrical about the Halo 3: ODST soundtrack in the past. But if you asked me to choose one song from it all, it would be Unforgotten, or as the rerecorded Halo 2 Anniversary edition version is named “Unforgotten Memories”. It is a wonderful theme that repeats itself throughout the second and third games, along with the inspired change of tact from the more well known gregorian monk chanting. But for good measure I’ve included that below along with some riffing guitar too.

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How Video Games Tackle My Misanthropy

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The closest words I could find to describe myself in regards to this article was ‘misanthrope’ and ‘nihilistic’, and yet that’s still not entirely accurate. Technology has progressed to a level that can propagate genuine fear in the human psyche. Not the ‘50s sci-fi death robots or the ‘70s Bond movie machines-of-destruction fear, but the Phillip K. Dick-esque psychological fears. The warnings of a futuristic society broken by humanity, like those played out visually in Charlie Brooker’s inspired dark satire, Black Mirror. Which is why when I see the Microsoft Hololens that was announced a few weeks back, I can’t help but imagine then bad things that it could do. The kind of salacious things that someone like Paul Veerhoven would put in a movie as an aside like a virtual, holographic erotic dancer, being viewed by a Dad of three at breakfast – living the subterfuge of the happy families lie.

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It’s not that I don’t trust the technology, but I don’t trust the operator. Which is why you could call me a misanthrope. But my opinion is that the human species are survivors and work to create the best things under the pressures of extinction and unity. In an age where I can walk 300 yards and pick up a box of Strawberries in mid-January, I feel more removed from any kind of human condition than I suspect I ever would have in previous generations. Which is why there is an escapism that I practice in video games. The escapism of the open-world dystopian/fantasy role-playing game or the escapism of a destroyed earth that you must walk to survive. Heading from realm to realm regardless of if its fiction is magical or futuristic.

If I were to list my favourite games of all time I would be sure to add Skyrim, Red Dead Redemption and Halo to that mix. Halo has a futuristic science-fiction world that borrows from many of the genres greatest tropes and presents them in a way that, while militaristic and brimming with bravado, creates the impression that there is more out there. The impression that there is more history to uncover, more secrets to be known and things more important than just throwing our DNA out to every planet with an excess of oxygen. Red Dead Redemption places itself in a changing world that operates like a Cormac McCarthy book. Its turn of the century gentrification and modernisation of the Wild West puts in to perspective how the elements of human greed and corruption have created such fallout that to live a simple, rewarding life is no longer possible and to survive in the 20th Century, some elements of the past must be destroyed to forge that.

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It’s this kind of connection I make to these games that makes me invest in the character I’m playing. Not because of divine or fatalistic consequence but because a situation has made this person rediscover what it means to be a human in some way. With Skyrim the free nature of how you can create your own story, whether it is through emergent gameplay or in an intertextual way through the game’s fiction, completely places you in that world. It’s a world at war with political allegiances astray all over, the threat of large creatures destroying everything and ancient history restoring or upsetting the balance by placing you at the centre of it. The same can be said for the way that Fallout 3 operates within its own fictional world.

To bring this in to a more recent context, the same can also be said for the Dragon Age series and the latest title, Dragon Age Inquisition. Dragon Age allows you to create someone who is fatalistically placed in the centre of a predicament but the way you make choices in this world is a lot purer, if you will, than your modern day life or even many similar games. When you make choices to peruse a relationship with another character in the game, it isn’t because their dowry will be rather large or because moving in together will save a lot more money in rent. It’s because you’ve decided that particular person is someone you want to get to know, to invest in, to discover. Like love and the forging of relationships should be. When you make the decision of which members of your party should come with you, it’s because they bring the best chance of survival and the best talents to that situation.

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It’s much more meaningful and dramatic compared to working on a PowerPoint as a team which you end up having to cover 75% of anyway. This is why so many people have replayed all of these games. Especially Skyrim and Dragon Age. Because there is the submission to playing the role presented before you that allows you to rise above the day-to-day postmodern nihilism that we live in. It’s the same reason people read books or view masses of DVD box sets and Netflix series. It’s even the same reason that people follow, attend and submit themselves to sports and the vast arenas they are played in; to be part of something bigger.

This is obviously escapism but because I write about games and have a passion for them, much like people do for movies, music, and other hobbies (for lack of a better word), I feel I have a much larger investment intellectually in them. So that I can see what parallels they have to our current human condition, or more to the point how the evolution of that condition has robbed us of the simpler, more honest notions in life. This misanthropy may be borne out fear but in the current context of cyber crime, viral news cycles, click bait and the anti-humanistic oppression that interconnectivity can bring, it is video games I turn to in order to remind myself of what humanity truly can be at its best and sometimes its worst. I think that is something we all need, even if video games aren’t the way you get it. Books, drama, theatre, however you remind yourself, anything is equally valid as long as you take away something human from it.

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In defence of Games Journalism

A response to this petition

Games journalism, and forgive the irony of this metaphor, seems to have received a lot of bad press lately. If you know why then that’s fine, we don’t need to mention it. If you don’t know why, I’m not going to gratify the situation by embellishing it further. Just read this piece from Forbes writer Paul Tassi.

There appears to be in America some kind of positive assertion of the public versus the oppressive and corrupt video games journalists and that the media has to be held to account. This coming from the home of Fox News means that apparently the perceived corruption of video games reporting is the biggest journalistic crime (not hating on America, just Fox news). Ethical standards are apparently in question, which is a nice idea given the hilarious bias of the American press (and most political press in general).

Far be it for me to point out that there are several more important issues in the country in question going on this very second as well as our own, let alone the rest of the world being slowly drawn in to what looks like an inevitable escalation of conflict in the middle east, that there is enough time to not only protest against games journalism but also specifically targeting Kotaku. And whilst I have been following this story there comes a point where you just need to back out of it because it isn’t your business and the rhetoric has become mind numbingly vindictive and malicious.

The following is a comedic sarcastic retort, it is meant as humour in a poor situation and should be taken as such.

Firstly, let me have my slightly sarcastic and comedic approach to this. The suggested protest appears to be late on Friday and at noon for the rest of the weekend during PAX in Seattle. This is mentioned so that it does not spoil your enjoyment of the convention, where people really care about games. Although the timing seems more focused around when people are going to eat rather than enjoy PAX.

You will also find that “yellow journalism,” which I’m assuming to be a move to call the particular parties cowardly, seems to be the most awkwardly arranged Pac Man cosplay flash mob ever. Using the aforementioned phrase as an ice breaker… Well I’m not sure what ice you are breaking but if you’re going to go up to someone dressed in yellow and are trying to spread awareness with a half concocted pick up line, then you might want to think about yellow. Seeing as the amount of Pikachu cosplay with young children, or their parents, who neither know nor care about these things probably want strangers coming up to them barking random phrases at them.

The comedic retort has ended now. I feel sad that the situation needs me to clarify such a section of this post.

Here’s the truth, speaking purely for the UK and the games journalism press here which, in my own way, I am immensely proud to be a part of and I love and enjoy every day I’m a part of it. As a job to have it is an incredible realisation of something I’ve loved for a large part of my life and of the skills I possess marrying together.

So it is hard for me to accept that this incredible industry and section of the media is being attacked so virulently due to recent events. Far be it for me to point out the past six years worth of independent reviews and court cases revolving around journalism and the UK press being a far more important and horrifying problem than the actions of a few people.

I have been a video games journalist for around four years. I have written for two very different and very excellent websites, as well as produced video, conducted interviews, performed voiceovers and hosted podcasts. I have networked my way around events that are put on by games publishers to promote their products in order to progress my career, as well as report on the showcases presented for us. Networking or “mingling closely” as it has been inferred, is essential in getting anywhere in any media career. Games, television, radio, print, publishing, marketing, PR… If people don’t know who you are then you will have a practically impossible task getting in to the industries I’ve mentioned. That is the reality of the modern world of job acquisition.

Speaking of jobs, it has been recently reported that there are only 40 full time jobs in UK games journalism. Now I’m sure you’ve seen how many different blogs, sites, articles, YouTube videos, etc, that are around the internet. I am part of one of those. I am not part of the magic 40, to coin a phrase. So yes that means that for the past four years I have earned a grand total of £0 by doing this job. If you’re having trouble with currency conversion that is $0. I do this job because I love games. We all do. We are all gamers, we always have been and we’ve worked tirelessly to try and get a foot in a door of a small industry that has close personal relations because we are all like a gaming clan where everyone looks after each other and has each others backs. It is like any small workforce in the same industry. You make friends, you make enemies, you make an impression and you network and make relationships. It is the nature of the metaphorical beast.

Do I do this for money? Well no, obviously not. My recent trip to Cologne to report on GamesCom was completely paid for by me. I was not subsidised or paid in any way to report on games by a site, by games publishers or by media outlets. Do I want to do it for money? Of course I do. I love the games industry because first and foremost I am a gamer and I want to share my experiences and I feel I can write well enough to cover the new games that you want to see as well as giving my opinion on games from my past, the industry or games criticism.

So let me be totally clear about my relationships. I have none other than professional interests in the industry. Yes we become friendly like in any industry and yes this familiarity helps us to get a look in behind the scenes. Without that, you wouldn’t have games journalism or anything other than reviews so if you have a problem with this then you have a problem with the system of journalism and media in general. There are outlets that are sponsored by consoles to be specific to their market and therefore get those scoops. There are news sites that get the interviews that you want to hear. There are YouTubers who get access to these games and help show these to you because YOU want them. That is all down to the relationships that everyone has worked hard to build.

As far as a ‘code of conduct’ goes, we have one. Everyone who is a journalist has one. The NUJ will no doubt be able to furnish you with them but thankfully our work as games journalists or staff writers does not require us to be as worried to the finer points of this code as we rarely would ever have a situation that say a political correspondent would where the particulars of it apply. By the way if you want relationships disclosed, you should ask the political correspondents what their relationships are and how they got them. They certainly didn’t get them being fresh faced out of college with an internship at their local paper giving them weight.

What I’m trying to say, whilst fully exposing myself and I’m sure many others who are in similar situations in the industry, is that this situation is getting really out of hand and being overblown due to the personal action of one aggrieved person really destroying the trust of privacy. This isn’t corruption or games journalism vs. the public, it’s just the actions of a vengeful individual who felt wronged. So please think of this if you are mounting a protest or if you feel personally let down by the games reporting media, remember that it is made up of people who love video games just the same as you. We encourage feedback and participation because we love to talk about games. We love to be honest with you about our adventures in this crazy industry and we love to share them with you.

If you get the impression that we are anything but that then I’m saddened that something that so many of us dedicate our own unpaid time to, and even those who are paid who work and have worked so hard to get where they are, has become jaded for you over something that isn’t even any of our business. I hope some common sense appears in this and we can get back to doing what we do best, talking about video games.

Return of the Blog

Hello blog.

It’s been nearly two months. Two busy months and a hell of a lot of Doctor Who. But that’s all done now. University is done and I’m back, ready to make outlandish terrible commentary on current events will an ill-informed argument and an occasional gripe.

So if you’re reading this, you likely follow me on twitter so I don’t need to tell you what I’ve been up to. You all know. So I will give you a quick highlight of what’s been going on in my brain and my current feelings.

1) Benedict Cumberbatch OWNS the new Star Trek movie. He’s incredible in it and it’s visually spectacular. Go and see it. Now… I mean right now. Stop reading and go.

2) Broadchurch is out on DVD. This has been one of the greatest bit of British TV series of recent times, written by the great Chris Chibnall. Get it and watch it. I even converted two of my most critical friends to it.

3) Speaking of British TV, Luther returns in the summer, and Mad Dogs returns next month. I am excited for great television, especially seeming the Americans are besting us at the moment in this regard. I also can’t believe Utopia got a second series and Pramface a third series.

4) Tony Pulis leaving Stoke, Mourhinio to Chelsea, Rafa to PSG, Anchelotti to Madrid. Football done.

5) Trying to get a job is a nightmare… Well unless I go back to hell (I don’t want to go back to hell).

6) I have a pile of computer games to play and I kind of can’t be bothered to do it. I’m just waiting for SimCity to come on Mac so I can play it properly. Still very bugged though *sadface*

7) I have a HUGE pile of books to read, starting with A Song of Ice and Fire saga. I will not be available for at least a year for any other book.

8) I have two book ideas, one radio sitcom idea, a few comedy ideas and I still dislike Dan Brown.

9) I need to see more Liverpool games and must make it so for next year.

10) On the recommendation of Megan Walsh (@megwalsh10), I still have not eaten the Bacon or Shredded Jerky Chocolate that my friend brought me from his travels in Hong Kong.

Done. Until next time, I’ll leave you with this picture of Matt Smith’s Doctor looking at what I’m doing on my computer.

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The Dissertation Diary – Christmas (Or How To Avoid Work)

Yes, the traditional holiday season of putting on weight and celebrating the change of year numbers has meant I’ve done absolutely nothing. Shit all. Bugger.

All I’ve actually HAD to do was read and I failed miserably. Being distracted by Halo, beard growing and eating.
So the plans for this year are as follows:

1) Finish University without leaving everything to the last minute.
2) Get really buff in January.
3) See if I can go on my friends stag do in May (during dissertation hand in time)
4) Maybe get another Radio Show on the go.
5) Write that Radio sitcom I’ve had planned for ages.
6) Write that Movie script I’ve had planned for ages.
7) See if I can go to see the Northern Lights.
8) Get some work experience.
9) Look in to a Masters Degree.
10) Don’t drink.

That last one isn’t just an idle resolution, for I am a Dryathlete. I’m raising money for Cancer Research UK by not drinking for a month. I’ll try and go further too. But if you wish to donate, visit www.justgiving.com/dryathlete-sean-cleaver or if you’re in the UK text PINT84 to 70070 to donate £5.

But the rest, all pie in the sky thinking really… Except maybe the get buff. Need to get back on the gym wagon. I also need to stop being distracted by video games. I thought Halo 4 was going to destroy my life, but NO. It’s not even my now ridiculous obsession with getting all the available achievements for all the Halo games, NO! It’s this game I picked up on sale called Tropico 4. You get to be a dictator running your own Banana Republic. A bit of a jokey city builder but it’s fun, easy pick up and play and just cool. I’m trying to find a citizen called Januito so I can have him executed… Ok maybe only certain people would get the humour.

So I hope my next update is more productive, but until then please sponsor me. You have no idea how hard not drinking is when you have a delicious 21 year old Johnnie Walker XR (google it) sat on the shelf. Also, if you don’t follow me on twitter you can (@cleaverslips) and even instagram now (seancleaver)! Here’s a selection of alright photos.

Lost In Whisky Translation
Tailgate To Heaven
Charity Shop Extreme Shopping
Some Local Winter Sight Seeing
Why I Write Rather Than Draw

Currently Reading: Tailgate To Heaven – Adam Goldstein, Ingenious Pain – Andrew Miller.

Storytelling 117 – The Successful Narrative Evolution of Halo

It’s no coincidence that many of the writing team from Bungie for Halo have now written novels. Without trying to be condescending or arrogant, anyone can write a book. But to write a good book, imply relationships and create something spectacular requires understanding of storytelling. To suggest that this is any different in video games would be naive. The evolution from a love letter to the science fiction tropes and characters of the 80s, with nods to iconic literature, might have made survived the first game well. But as soon as Halo became more than just one game, the challenge was not to let the rich universe they had created down. Many different series in television for example have the problem of crumbling under their own weight. Without watching it myself, I am reliably informed that Lost is a good example of this.


With the limitations of the technology of the time, compared to now of course, this need to tell something entertaining is paramount to creating an enjoyable video game. It always has been and if we are honest with ourselves with any of the franchise lust/technologically blinkered vision, the problem with modern computer games. Which is sad because we all like games, we all appreciate the ridiculous sacrifice of man-hours to complete such a graphical opus and we certainly want to spend our money on them. But, and I’m going from the traditions of point and click LucasArts mastery all the way to Lego Harry Potter with this one, you need a good story if you want to make a good game. Otherwise the artists, and they are artists, will strive for hours to create a collection of pretty pixels that end up being YouTube clips. Even sports games, let’s take the FIFA series as an example, employ some form of narrative to keep the game entertaining. You have the personal narrative of besting your friends but there are Ultimate Team and Manager modes where you are basically writing your own fantasy football story with you as the great architect of it. In fact any career mode in any sports game is a narrative. Be under no illusions, this is a very interactive narrative device that the earliest of board games employed. Is the joy of winning at Monopoly simply winning? Or is it the recalling of how you carefully planned and plotted where to build your Hotels and how employed tactics to create your own empire?

Halo rose to the challenge of a potentially limited one off premise to create a ten game saga and an incredibly rich universe. Which is ultimately why I keep coming back to it. In fact I will go on record as saying I wasn’t really interested in Halo 4. I am now, having been brought it and completed it for all its worth. But I failed to see how a new trilogy for the Master Chief would benefit the story of the Halo Universe. I was happy to leave this spectre, this hero in the eyes of humanity, tragically floating endlessly in space waiting for a rescue that would never come. Because, by Halo 3, the joy for me wasn’t just playing a good game, it was seeing how it ended. I was happy because the Chief and Cortana were together and they were where they needed to be, as they were right at the beginning of Halo: Combat Evolved: On standby. I enjoyed that the games continued though as the obviously rich source of material the Halo Universe had coined was now ripe for the picking. Halo 3: ODST received a lot of criticism due to it being basically an add-on repackaged as a independent title. But I firmly believe it is the best Halo game. The narrative structure of flashbacks, snapshots and detective work was beautifully played against the artistic vision of the game itself. Dark, desolate, broody and above all, lost. Halo Reach answered some questions about why the Spartans were created and how this war started. It could have used the incredible story that Eric Nylund wrote about the Fall of Reach detailing the programme and the growing of John-117. But it didn’t. It used the universe to its advantage to create arguable a better story for video gaming. Everything that has been done throughout the Halo’s has been useful in sustaining and creating this great fiction. Which is why the series has spawned so many sequels, prequels, spin-offs, and live action features and adverts.


Take Grand Theft Auto 4 for example here of useful/non-useful in-game narrative. Girlfriends can be a useful element in its game play. They give you some bonuses when you need them. In the narrative however, they mostly benefit nothing to the overall story of the game. They allow you to play the game with a relaxation on difficulty but to this great American Dream that Niko Bellic is slowly discovering, they become an irritant to the player. It’s your judgement as to if they are worth the investment of time and stress in the game but the fact that they do isn’t because they make the game harder to complete or affect your playing ability. It’s that they take you out of the story and create another one that you feel you don’t need or takes things needlessly too far. Their inclusion is useful to the nuts and bolts of driving down the street being annoying tailed by a policeman but not to what you’re actually invested in, the story of Niko Bellic. Which is why the follow up Halo games are good. Because by the end of Halo 3, also in part thanks to a stellar cast who bring these roles to life and great musical direction, the narrative arc of the Master Chief is done, but you are invested in the Universe it’s created. You want to stretch your legs and know more. Reach out and become a part of it, more than just from behind the amber visor of the super solider. You feel like you’ve been assimilated into the ethos of Halo’s fictional future and that is very a powerful thing.

The successes for this are simple, well they sound simple. They are in fact incredibly difficult and taken utterly for granted. The first is the relationship, dialogue and evolution between the Chief and Cortana. Something that Halo 4 does very well is point out this weird duality between the two of them that one is a machine and one is human, yet the reversal of this is the basis of the relationship. They are in love, partners, paternal, and completely symbiotic. The exciting thing is that this dissolving of their dynamic in the future Halo games will change the Chiefs character exponentially and how 343i handle this. But there is something so natural and endearing between the two that has held the games together where they are involved. Secondly is Halo 2… Yes, Halo 2. This game expanded the universe successfully when, ultimately, it didn’t need to. But it did and we are thankful. The religious nature of the covenant, their society castes, the civil war, the flood, the destruction of humanity, the sheer cinematic quality and scope of the entire game really helped the series, and arguably video games (Half Life not withstanding), out of a hole to really remember how important story is to any entertainment experience. The switch from cheaper alternatives to give a game its full scope (actors, writing, development, concepts, even the inclusion of an orchestra over computer-synthesised music) lifted the console market into a new era and challenged a lot of conceptions on what actually makes a good game. Without Halo 2 being so well produced, in all regards, most of your blockbuster games wouldn’t be as good.


Of course, the universe is still key to Halo, or it is at least perceived to be. It’s not just a cult following of fans like television shows get. It’s an important part of people’s hobbies. For many years in the future, generations will recall how good they used to feel after playing a Halo game and how they don’t make them like they used to anymore. The universe is the most important part of that. Comics, movies, soundtracks, novels (although someone should really re-novelise The Flood. No offence to Mr Detiz but it was pretty rubbish) have all expanded the universe. I’m sure at some point in the future; someone will give a Peter Jackson that blank cheque to create a film trilogy. Because the source material is so rich, it would be very hard not to be able to create a decent script. I could do it and I would do it. I could even see how Halo could become a couple of television mini-series. Halo in the past 11 years has evolved in every sense, not just in narrative. Now it is taking a fresh evolutionary turn with the new trilogy. Everyone is aware that 343i can create a very good playable game. But what we really need is a great story. Halo 4 had some hints of one, but ultimately was quite forced and felt slightly stagnant in how it handled progressing the story compared to the previous games. We have another 2 games, and presumably a new console to launch, with these titles. We only hope, as fans and I as a critic, that 343i will be up to the task of carrying out the audacious narrative arc they are embarking on.

What game to play? Hmm….

I have a choice of three games to play at the moment and I can’t decide which I want to play.

Choice 1) Lego Star Wars.

Having just completely completed Lego Harry Potter, I want to do the same to Lego Star Wars and especially unlock Admiral Ackbar. Mainly so I can laugh at myself for shouting “It’s a Trap!” in every confrontation. But I get the feeling that it’s far too much Lego for one man to endure.

Choice 2) Fallout 3

A game I’ve started and never really bothered to continue. My main reason? I forget what I’m doing and really despise being over encumbured. I have no idea what there is that is actually useful, so I keep what I can and sell it when I can. But I end up having to dump most of it. It infuriates me.

Choice 3) Mass Effect

I’ve started Mass Effect. My friend raves about it. In all likelihood, I should love this game. It’s Sci-Fi, big, immersive and has a great story. But for some reason I just cannot drum up any enthusiasm about it. It just bores me. It’s almost too big maybe? I can’t explain it. Everyone’s talking about Mass Effect 3 and getting excited. I still have Mass Effect 2 in it’s cellophane wrapper. I just can’t get any fun out of playing it. Maybe it’s just me.

I’ll give Mass Effect another go I think.